University of Missouri Law School Guide to Class Action includes Rose Law Group Class Action Chair, Kathryn Honecker

Rose Law Group’s Class Action Chair, Kathryn Honecker, has been referenced in the University of Missouri Law School Guide to Class Action. Here’s an excerpt from the guide: “In order for an action to be brought under FRCP 23, the requirements of Rule 23(a) must be met. These requirements are generally summarized in four key words: numerosity, commonality, typicality, and adequacy. Numerosity.   Numerosity requires …

U.S. agency moves to allow class-action lawsuits against financial firms; Class actions necessary to protect consumers says Kathryn Honecker, Chair of Rose Law Group Class Action Dept

By Jessica Silver-Greenberg and Michael Corkery | The New York Times The nation’s consumer watchdog is adopting a rule on Monday that would pry open the courtroom doors for millions of Americans, restoring their right to bring class-action lawsuits against financial firms. Under the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau rule, banks and credit card companies could no longer force customers into arbitration …

Kathryn Honecker, Rose Law Group Chair of Class Action Department, receives enthusiastic review as contributing author of ‘The Class Action Fairness Act: Law and Strategy’

From the American Bar Association book review of The Class Action Fairness Act: Law and Strategy By Charles S. Fax “Graphics are one of the best features of the book, effectively enhancing the material’s accessibility. Contributor Kathryn Honecker, [Co-Chair of the American Bar Association’s Section of Litigation’s Consumer Litigation Committee, previously served as Co-Chair of the Class Actions & Derivative Suits Committee], has …

Kathryn Honeker, Rose Law Group Class Action Department Chair, comments on Target’s decision to refund more than $90 million for fake Egyptian cotton sheets

Business Insider Target is offering customers millions of dollars in refunds after discovering that it sold fake Egyptian cotton sheets. The sheets were manufactured by Welspun India, a global textile company that’s a key supplier to many US retailers including Bed Bath & Beyond, Walmart, JCPenney, and Macy’s, Bloomberg reports. Welspun’s shares have fallen 20% after the news. The sheets were sold …

Rose Law Group Chair of Class Action Department, Kathryn Honecker Appointed to Co-Chair ABA Consumer Litigation Committee

Rose Law Group is pleased to announce that Kathryn Honecker, chair of Rose Law Group’s Class Action Department, has been appointed to serve as the co-chair of the Consumer Litigation Committee of the American Bar Association’s Section of Litigation. The Consumer Litigation Committee’s mission is to educate and serve as a a resource for practitioners to keep abreast of the …

Class Actions 101: A Primer on Elevated Health Claims; by Rose Law Group Class Actions attorney Kathryn Honecker

By Kathryn Honecker and Eric Zard | American Bar Association In this edition of Class Actions 101, we answer some common questions young lawyers may have when asserting or defending claims that a product’s marketing, advertising, packaging, or labeling contains exaggerated or untrue health statements. What Are the Most Common Practices Subject to Class Actions? As with all niche practice …

Rose Law Group Chair of Class Action Department Kathryn Honecker talks to ‘The Wall Street Journal’ about important class action case

Case in California would base attorneys’ compensation on hours, not a percentage by Sara Randazzo | The Wall Street Jounrnal A case before California’s highest court could fundamentally change the way class action attorneys are paid—and cut lawyers’ fees in the process. Typically, attorneys who represent plaintiffs in class actions—like employees accusing a company of discrimination, or customers claiming a …

The heroes who stopped Subway’s foot-long fakery; Rose Law Group Chair of Class Actions Department Kathryn Honecker comments

by Mary Fetzer | Avvo Naked Law Thanks to a class action suit for false advertising, Subway restaurants in the United States will now measure every 6-inch and foot-long sandwich they make. Moving forward, customers can expect to get what they paid for. Still, no one will get rich from this legal wrangling. So why did anyone bother? Answer: there …